Reusing components

Reusing components

All along Computer History, there have been some paradigms that have changed the way of developing software.

For example, Waterfall development in 1962, Structured development in the 70s, Object-Oriented development in 80s and 90s, Agile development at the end of the 90s… And what about the future? Recently, I have read that in the next years what will be very transcendent is… certified reusable components.

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Did you mean…?

Did you mean…?

Have you ever looked for something on Google having mistaken the spell of the words? Ok, I think we all have. In this case, unless you have written something totally intelligible, the most famous searh engine would have asked to you something starting with: “Did you mean…?”.

For example, if we typed “Optymith”, Google would “say”: “Did you mean Optimyth?” or if we wrote “LerBon Janes”, it would correct our misspelling by replacing our search for “LeBron James”.

Wouldn’t it be interesting having something like this when we write code?

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Maintaining performance or perform maintainability?

Maintaining performance or perform maintainability?

I remember when, some years ago, my boss said to the audience of a public event: “A second could make the difference between you and your competitors”. Nowadays, it is still a big truth.
Concerning web applications, this assertion means that, for example, a slow access could transform a normal user into a bored one and, in this case, they would leave the web page and, probably, for good. Bad news. It can be worse, though; imagine that we are responsible of a real time application: definitely, a second could distort the reality.

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Surfing through quality models

Surfing through quality models

When we analyze the quality of an already developed software, it is important to choose thoroughly the quality model to use.

We could use a standard quality model which considers reliability with the same importance that it sees maintainability, or security just like performance. But what if my software has very specific characteristics or needs? This is a question that we can’t avoid, taking into account that it happens very often.

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Improving your testing team’s reliability

Improving your testing team’s reliability

Static code analyzers are typically used as “bug finders”: to detect programming bad practices, to get software design metrics or complexity metrics, etc.

However, in Optimyth Software we use static analysis to build a muti-technology dependency map of the software to help organizations, for example, to run impact analysis during the different stages of the software development life cycle. If you are a an Optimyth customer or you are one of our blog’s followers, you have probably guessed that the product I’m talking about is checKing AIM.

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